Revolutionary Aerospace Applications:
Prototype Mitsubushi Titanium Alloy Jet Turbine K7801
    As featured at Aerospace Expo '98 (Long Beach Convention Centre, Long Beach, CA)


   Titanium was initially stimulated for aerospace applications in 1887 and since then has advanced in leaps and bounds. Introducing the future of aerospace design; the Mitsubushi Forged Titanium Alloy Jet Turbine K7801.  Constructed almost entirely of an extremely strong titanium alloy the new turbine surpasses any existing turbine in performance, maintenance and resilience. (according to lab benchmarks)
    New titanium forging technology has allowed increasingly complex parts previously thought impossible to be produced with tolerances exceeding steel forging.
  But why Titanium when Steel and Aluminum are so readily available??
    Titanium has many desirable characteristics, notably low densities, which fall between those of aluminum and iron giving titanium very attractive strength-to-weight ratios.  In addition titanium and titanium alloys readily form stable protective surface layers which give the excellent corrosion resistance, including oxidizing acids and chlorides, and good elevated temperature properties up to about 440 degrees (1022 degrees F).  Table 1 compares the physical properties of Steel, Stainless, Aluminum.

Desirable Characteristics of Titanium include:


 


Abundance and Methods of Production

    Titanium, is the fourth most abundant metallic element in the earth's crust and occurs naturally as an oxide ore. It is found in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, China, Australia, Russia, as well as other countries.  Most commonly found as rutile (titanium dioxide) and ilmenite (iron-titanium oxide) with rutile being the most abundant course of titanium.
    The commercial extraction process involves treatment of the ore with chlorine gas to produce titanium tetra-chloride, which is purified and reduced to a metallic
titanium sponge by reaction with magnesium or sodium. The sponge, blended with alloying elements (and re-claimed scrap) as desired, is then vacuum melted.
Several meltings may be necessary to achieve a titanium homogeneous ingot which is ready for processing into useful shapes, typically by forging followed by rolling.


Costs of Manufacturing and Production


    Due to it's unique properties Titanium presents a unique set of machining problems, many of those problems can be alleviated or eliminated by adhering to the following set of guidelines:     Due to these strict guidelines, manufacturing of  Titanium can be very costly.  At Titanium Industries we have the unique ability to custom make forged products for our customers complying to our strict code of quality.  For many applications the cost of titanium alloys can be justified on the basis of desirable properties.
   For performance, quality and resistance Titanium is truly the wise choice.
    For a brochure on the Mitsubushi Titanium Jet Turbine or a quote on any of Titanium Industry's other fine products please contact us at:
    Titanium Industries Inc.


Physical Properties and Material Safety Data


PRODUCT NAME: Titanium
FORMULA: Ti
HAZARD CLASS: Flammable solid.
FORMULA WEIGHT: 47.90
BOILING POINT: 3277 C (5931 F)
MELTING POINT: 1677 C (3051 F)
SPECIFIC GRAVITY: 4.51
VAPOUR DENSITY: 1.6
SOLUBILITY (H2O): Negligible (Less than 0.1%)
APPEARANCE & ODOR: Dark gray, lustrous metallic with no odor
 
ISOTOPE COMPOSITION OF TITANIUM
ISOTOPE
ATOMIC MASS (X10-8 g)
NATURAL ABUNDANCE (%)
46Ti
45.9526294(14)
8.25(3)
47Ti
46.9517640(11)
7.44(2)
48Ti
47.9479473(11)
73.72(3)
49Ti
48.9478711(11)
5.41(2)
50Ti
49.9447921(12)
5.18(2)

LABORATORY PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT: Safety Glasses, Lab Coat, Class D Extinguisher
VENTILATION: Use adequate general or local exhaust ventilation to keep fume or dust levels as low as possible.
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: None required where adequate ventilation conditions exist. If airborne concentration is high, us appropriate respirator or dust mask.

UNUSUAL FIRE & EXPLOSION HAZARDS: Dust may form explosive mixture with air
TOXIC GASES PRODUCED: Oxides
EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE: Dust inhalation may cause tightness and pain in chest, coughing, and difficulty in breathing.  Contact with skin or eyes may cause  irritation.
ROUTES OF ENTRY: Inhalation, skin contact and eye contact.
EMERGENCY & FIRST AID PROCEDURES: Call a physician. If swallowed, if conscious, immediately induce vomiting.  If inhaled, remove to fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes. Flush skin with water.
STABILITY: Stable
CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Heat, flame and other sources of ignition.
INCOMPATIBLES: Mineral acids, strong oxidizing agents, halogens and carbon dioxide.
DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS: Oxides